Introduction – COM1215: Photography – Exposure

Posted in COM 1215 on April 27, 2011 by iamcolwell

Pre-requisite: Visual Compositon COM 1005

Quick Link to Learner Outcomes: COM 1215

“Students learn the technical and creative uses of aperature, shutter speed and ISO, and demontrate how combinations of the 3 elements give very different results…”

Chart Found Here!

Assignment 10 – CLASS PRESENTATION

Posted in COM 1205 on April 6, 2011 by iamcolwell

Create a display using 5 predefined photographs.  You may use  a POWER POINT presentation or create the presentation as a post in your personal blog.  You will use the SMART BOARD as a tool in your presentation.  Your discussion of each photograph will be based on the following criteria:

  • How I used composition guidelines to help facilitate good arrangement.
  • What are the technical and creative aspects of the work? (Quality, focus, rule of thirds)
  • What are areas that were challenging?  Are there any solutions?

 

 Image Link

You will be evaluated on the following criteria:

  1. Appropriate langauge (meeting school & community standards)
  2. 5 Photographs and Discussion
  3. Presentation Clarity
  4. Self-Evaluation
  5. Add your finished work to a portfolio (you may use your personal blog or a saved document file)

5 PORTFOLIO TIPS!  Check this out… click on the link!

 Learning Outcome: COM 1205: 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4

Assignment 9 – “In Focus”

Posted in COM 1205, Photo Links on April 5, 2011 by iamcolwell

Prepare a study of one object in which you capture the image from 4 different distances. 

  • Each image should have a clear focal point. 
  • This focal point needs to be in focus. 
  • Use basic composition guideline: the rule of thirds.

In other words:  You will submit 4 photographs of one object, from 4 different distances.  For example object:

  •  Extreme Close-up
  • Close-up
  • Medium Shot
  • Long Shot

This website will help!

Learning Outcome: COM 1205: 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

Lesson 8 – Understanding ISO Settings

Posted in COM 1205 on April 4, 2011 by iamcolwell

International Standards Organization (ISO)

Increasing the ISO setting lets you take clear photos in dim light without having to use a flash, but it also degrades the image quality.

What ISO denotes is how sensitive the image sensor is to the amount of light present. The higher the ISO, the more sensitive the image sensor and therefore the possibility to take pictures in low-light situations.

And, where you would have needed to physically change to a different roll of film if you wanted a different ISO speed, digital technology allows you to simply dial one in. In this way, you can record images taken at different ISO speeds on the same memory card.

ISO Speed & Exposure

ISO speed affects the shutter speed / aperture combinations you can use to obtain correct exposure.

Suppose your digital camera’s light meter warns you there is not enough light to correctly expose a scene. You could use the on-board flash, but let’s suppose again it’s not allowed (like in a concert or indoors recital).

You would then need to use a higher ISO. Set on “ISO Auto” mode, your digital camera will automatically select a higher ISO. Otherwise, you can manually select the next higher ISO and see if the increased sensitivity allows you to obtain a correctly exposed picture. If it does, you can now take a correctly exposed picture.

Similarly, if you find the camera is using a shutter speed that is too slow (1/60 sec. and slower) to handhold the camera steady and shake-free (thus resulting in blurred pictures), and you cannot open up the aperture anymore, and you do not have a tripod or other means to hold the camera steady, and you want to capture the action, etc. — then you might select the next higher ISO which will then allow you to select a faster shutter speed.

ISO Speed & Noise

However, all this increase in sensitivity does not come free. There is a price to pay with your image appearing more noisy.

See, when you boost the sensitivity of your image sensor by selecting a higher ISO, the image sensor is now able to record a fainter light signal. However, it is also true now that it will record fainter noise, where noise is any signal that is not attributed to the light from your subject. Remember that an image sensor is still an analog device and it generates its own noise, too! The increased sensitivity allows the image sensor to record more light signal and more noise. The ratio of light signal to noise (S/N ratio) determines the “noise” in your resultant image.

Just as with its film counterpart, an image sensor will exhibit “noise” (comparable to “graininess” in film) at the higher ISO speeds. Unlike film, where graininess can sometimes contribute to the mood of the image, noise produced by an image sensor is undesirable and appears as a motley of distracting coloured dots on your image.

More on ISO click here.

Assignment 7 – Processing Images

Posted in COM 1205 on March 16, 2011 by iamcolwell

So you’ve captured an amazing image. Now what? How you have your image processed and printed can be just as important, or more important, than the image itself. Your print is your presentation of your work. Make sure its a good presentation by understanding your options.

Who Will Process/Print My Photographs?

Who will develop/print your photographs is a huge decision. For many years, and to a large degree today, the biggest difference between amateur photographers and professional photographers was the labs. Oftentimes a professional’s negatives and raw images looked little better than an amateur’s. The photography lab that offered individualized processing and cropping made the images match the photographer’s vision. Ansel Adams preferred to process his own images so he retained complete control over the creation process. Photography processing should not be taken lightly.

 
So you’ve captured an amazing image on film or digital sensor. Now what? How you have your image processed and printed can be just as important, or more important, than the image itself. Your print is your presentation of your work. Make sure its a good presentation by understanding your options.

Who Will Process/Print My Photographs?

Who will develop your negatives and/or pint your photographs is a huge decision. For many years, and to a large degree today, the biggest difference between amateur photographers and professional photographers was the labs. Oftentimes a professional’s negatives and raw images looked little better than an amateur’s. The photography lab that offered individualized processing and cropping made the images match the photographer’s vision. Ansel Adams preferred to process his own images so he retained complete control over the creation process. Photography processing should not be taken lightly.
 
Choosing the Best Print Size
Once you have taken an image and chosen a processing option, you must decide on what size and format to print your image. This process often takes new photographers by surprise when their enlargements do not look like the original image. 35mm film and most digital sensors shoot in a 3:2 ratio. This fits the 4×6 photograph with which we are all very familiar. However, this format ratio is not the same for 5×7 and 8×10 prints. If you have composed your image for a 4×6 format ratio and then print the image as a 8×10 print you will likely loose some of your subject. Understanding the relationships of these different print sizes is the first step in knowing how to compose your images for the most flexibility in printing.
 
Why Are Some of My Photos Shiny and Others are Flat?
Now that you know who will print/process your images and what sizes you want them to be printed, you need to decide what surface the images will be printed onto. The surface finish of your photographs can make a huge difference in the overall look of your images. Much like the different paint finishes, glossy and matte result in two distinct looks.
 
Glossy
Glossy finish images tend to look as if they are wet or have been coated in clear lacquer.  Properties of Glossy Prints:
  • High detail images possible
  • Reflections often make it difficult to see image in bright light
  • Most common inkjet paper type
  • Shows fingerprints and smudges
Matte
Matte finish images have a flat, non-reflective look to them.  Properties of Matte Prints:
  • Loss of fine image detail
  • Dull look to images
  • Not commonly available
  • Does not show fingerprints
Semi-gloss
Semi-gloss finish images have a somewhat shiny textured surface similar to tiny pebbles. This finish is often called matte by lower-cost labs.  Properties of Semi-gloss Prints:
  • Minor loss of fine image detail
  • Deep look to images
  • Do not show reflections
  • Do not who fingerprints or smudges

  

Did you know?  Capturing RAW Images:

Most digital cameras process and compress the pictures you take immediately after capturing the image. This can be helpful, as it keeps the file sizes low (using JPEG compression) and takes care of color correction, including white-balance, tint, and exposure, so you don’t have to. However, some people, such as professional photographers, prefer to have more control over how each image is processed. Therefore, many high-end cameras have the ability to shoot in RAW mode. This mode does not compress the images at all and leaves them completely unprocessed.
 

This Photo was found Here

 

The Assignment:

Process and print for display a minimum of 6 images in final format.  Describe the process you used and why you chose it.

Late Weekly Inspirations Shots!

Posted in Colwell's Comments on March 15, 2011 by iamcolwell

The deadline for LATE WIS shots it March 24th (last day before SPRING BREAK!) 

When we get back it is a fresh start!

Did You Notice?

Posted in Colwell's Comments on March 7, 2011 by iamcolwell

I have created a brand new category for you to submit your work. The category is called IT’s SICK!!!

If you have taken a photo you think is amazing, but it doesn’t fit into the WIS category, the IT’s SICK category is where you can post for all of us to admire!